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Two teens killed in Spokane Valley car crash

Published On: Dec 24 2013 09:06:59 AM CST
Updated On: Oct 06 2013 09:57:59 PM CDT
Two teens killed in Spokane Valley car crash
SPOKANE VALLEY, Wash. -

Two University High School students were killed Saturday night in a car crash on a residential road. One teenage boy is still recovering in the hospital.

Many people woke up in the Spokane Valley to a nightmare because two of their friends didn't wake up at all. Some hearing the news from each other.

"I said, ‘Well, are they alive?’ And he said ‘No, they're dead,’ and I said, 'No, that's not possible. They can't be dead.' But they are," said U-High senior Sarah Melvin.

"It's just been really tough because we are a tight knit community. Everybody cares about each other,” said U-High assistant principal Ken Vansickle.

Around 9 p.m. Saturday night the two girls, Josie Freier and McKenzie Mott were traveling in a sedan driven by Preston Maher.

They were northbound on Bates when deputies say it appeared Maher lost control, the car hit the curb, and hit a tree passenger-side first.

Deputies say the driver was not impaired but he was likely speeding.

"Once I think I realize and then it's just like, she's not coming back,” said U-High junior Kelsi Walker.

Josie and McKenzie were both sophomores at U-High. Friends describe them as fun-loving, hilarious, spontaneous, caring and sweet. McKenzie played on the U-High soccer team.

"Practice was always fun with her. She'd always be there to listen to your problems and stuff and just loved to hear about your day," said Walker.          

Sonja Bertrand knew both girls well and was with them last night at a birthday party where they watched a movie and were eating s’mores.

“They said they had to go back to baby-sit someone. They called Preston and he picked them up. That was the last I heard," said Bertrand.

She says the driver, Preston, was planning on taking Josie to homecoming this year.

"They were nice to everybody. They didn't judge anybody on what they looked like, they just tried to be friends with everybody," said Bertrand.

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