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WSU helps Glen the eagle soar

By Aaron Luna, KXLY4 Reporter / Weather Anchor , aaronl@kxly.com
Published On: Nov 27 2012 06:27:49 PM CST
Updated On: Nov 27 2012 08:33:13 PM CST
Glen the Eagle
SPOKANE, Wash. -

Glen the eagle was found injured along Nine Mile Falls Road last June and was given just a 30-percent chance of surviving. Glen beat the odds, however, and was released back into the wild Tuesday.

Glen spent most of her recovery time down in Pullman at Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine where, until recently, doctors weren't sure she would ever return to the wild.

Despite all the odds Glen made a full recovery and was released Tuesday at the Little Spokane River Natural Area..

"I honestly never thought that bird would fly again," Dr. Nickol Finch said.

The 5-year-old bald eagle almost died last June when Robert Hutton found her on Nine Mile Road north of Spokane.

"At first I didn't know if she was going to make it. She actually fell asleep in the back of my truck on the way to the vet," Hutton said.

She was sick, not eating, and doctors gave her a 30-percent chance to live.

"The strongest survive. That's nature," Hutton said.

And like the country she represents, Glen did prove to be one of the strongest. But she still faced another challenge.

"She had a fracture that was very close to the joint and I didn't think she would be able to stretch that joint out again," Dr. Finch said.

At that point, Glen needed to be placed in a permanent home or face euthanization. Once again she defied the odds and reached for the skies on Tuesday, just a few miles from where Hutton found her.

"This is just great. Words can't describe it," Hutton said.

Glen is fitted with an ankle tag with a number on it that someone can call if they find her. As she stretches her wings out and builds up her endurance, Finch and Hutton are proud of Glen's accomplishments so far and wish her the best in her return to the skies.

"Even if she only raises one more clutch that's two or three more bald eagles in the world," Finch said.

"Any chance that I see a bald eagle I'm pulling over and I have an extra pair of binoculars with me that I carry and I will be looking," Hutton added.

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